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The 10th edition of Poultry World 2019 is now online

In the 10th edition of Poultry World for 2019 we learn about the microbiome and its significance. We visit a poultry fam in Finland, where the use of antibiotics ended in 2010. This edition also explores the option of using insects to convert waste into protein. In addition, IPPE is coming up in January and we present 4 reasons this cannot be missed.

Dr Andrew Morgan at DuPont Nutrition & Biosciences has spent some 3 decades researching the microbiome. In this article he offers us some understanding into the deep knowledge into the science around nutrition, the microbiome, and gut and immune function.

“…we have come a long way and we have been amazed by the interactions between the microbes that live in the gut and the host physiology…” said Dr Morgan. Photo: DuPont
“…we have come a long way and we have been amazed by the interactions between the microbes that live in the gut and the host physiology…” said Dr Morgan. Photo: DuPont

The upcoming International Production and Processing Expo (IPPE) will take place at the end of January in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Poultry World looks at 4 reasons to attend the show, which is the largest event for the global poultry sector.

The IPPE is organised by the US Poultry and Egg Association and attracts and international audience. Photo: IPPE
The IPPE is organised by the US Poultry and Egg Association and attracts and international audience. Photo: IPPE

Russia has focused on increasing self-sufficiency since the international community imposed trade restrictions on the country in 2014. We look at to see what is next for Russia, which sits in 12th position globally in terms of poultrymeat consumption per capita.

Russians consume 33kg of poultrymeat per capita per year, but Sergey Lakhtyukhov , director general of the Russian Union of Poultry Producers, says his industry is geared for international growth. Photo: Vladislav Vorotnikov
Russians consume 33kg of poultrymeat per capita per year, but Sergey Lakhtyukhov , director general of the Russian Union of Poultry Producers, says his industry is geared for international growth. Photo: Vladislav Vorotnikov

In Finland, where there are 435 poultry farms and about 8.8 million broilers, it is impressive to learn that antibiotics have been redundant in the Finnish broiler sector for almost 10 years. A local broiler farmer explains how this can be.

At Tiina Varho-Lankinen’s broiler farm in Finland, there are 3 houses, one which accommodates 15,000 broilers, a second which houses 30,000, and a third which has space for 75,000 broilers. Photo: Jorma Heikkila
At Tiina Varho-Lankinen’s broiler farm in Finland, there are 3 houses, one which accommodates 15,000 broilers, a second which houses 30,000, and a third which has space for 75,000 broilers. Photo: Jorma Heikkila

We visit Ad’oro, a family-owned poultry processing plant in Brazil which has about 300 farms within a 250km radius supplying it with broilers. The plant manages approximately 220,000 birds a day and focuses on cut up and deboning.

With 240 poultry processing plants each slaughtering over 50,000 birds per day, Brazil is a poultrymeat production powerhouse. Photo: Fabian Brockötter
With 240 poultry processing plants each slaughtering over 50,000 birds per day, Brazil is a poultrymeat production powerhouse. Photo: Fabian Brockötter

Using insects to convert waste into protein could be a big win, but regulations and commercialisation remain barriers. Former MultiBox executive, James White, tells us more about this untapped protein source for livestock.

Cleanliness and biosecurity are the focus points at one of Brazil’s well-known cooperatives, Lar, which covers the entire production chain from feed to slaughter to supermarkets. With African Swine Fever having a devastating effect on Asia, opportunities for Lar are plentiful.

A Lar feed mill in Santa Helena, Brazil. Photo: Vincent ter Beek
A Lar feed mill in Santa Helena, Brazil. Photo: Vincent ter Beek

Poultry World looks a little closer into the belief that muscle abnormalities can be reduced by growing birds in a semi-intensive system and giving them more time to mature.

Carcass quality, composition and consumer evaluation of meat from slow-growing broilers was evaluated. Photo: Michel Zoeter
Carcass quality, composition and consumer evaluation of meat from slow-growing broilers was evaluated. Photo: Michel Zoeter

In this last edition of 2019, Poultry World also considers how the poultry industry can source and leverage the value of feed data, and we look at a pilot study on the viral status at broiler farms and how it aims to increase awareness of the importance of cleaning and disinfecting poultry houses. Finally, columnist Jake Davies talks about how African Swine Fever has dominated 2019.

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