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Poultry World edition 6 of 2020 is now online

In this edition of Poultry World we look into a new, quick and inexpensive method to detect Campylobacter. We see how French poultry farmers on encouraging consumers to spend more money on animal-friendly meat and eggs, and we discuss how to better manage feed costs with probiotics. Furthermore, housefly larvae are under the microscope – is this a viable protein source for poultry?

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New and fast detection of Campylobacter

The current methods that test flocks for Campylobacter take more than 4 days. Presented by an EU consortium, an inexpensive new air-sampling method – the first ever such system on the market – yields results in just 2 hours and indicate both the presence and the level. Future tests could also include sampling of Salmonella.

Up to 4 times more chicken flocks show signs of Campylobacter colonisation with the new air-sampling mini-vacuum. Photo: Dick van Doorn
Up to 4 times more chicken flocks show signs of Campylobacter colonisation with the new air-sampling mini-vacuum. Photo: Dick van Doorn

Welfare label ensures a premium for meat and eggs

A group of poultry farmers in France aims to encourage consumers to spend more money on animal-friendly eggs and meat. They produce poultry with 3 different welfare labels, namely organic, free-range, and the French Label Rouge.

Broilers have plenty of space, both inside and outside the house. Photo: Hans Siemes
Broilers have plenty of space, both inside and outside the house. Photo: Hans Siemes

Detecting mycotoxin lesions in slaughterhouses

It is standard practice to sample feed ingredients to test for mycotoxin contamination in feed, but Agrimprove is now taking a different approach and looks at mycotoxin lesions in slaughterhouses.

Kevin Vanneste, Agrimprove product manager: “Specialists look for specific lesions related to mycotoxins macroscopically.” Photo: Agrimprove
Kevin Vanneste, Agrimprove product manager: “Specialists look for specific lesions related to mycotoxins macroscopically.” Photo: Agrimprove

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Managing poultry feed costs with probiotics

Recent findings indicate how probiotic bacteria enhances energy utilisation. This offers producers an additional tool to manage ration costs as energy is a major feed cost.

Housefly larvae contribute to sustainable layer nutrition

Are housefly larvae a viable protein source in sustainable layer nutrition, and could it fully replace soya at a competitive price? In this article we dig into the details.

There is much potential for insects in poultry feed as the production of insects demands limited amounts of water and land and they can add value to low-value by-products. Photo: Koos Groenewold
There is much potential for insects in poultry feed as the production of insects demands limited amounts of water and land and they can add value to low-value by-products. Photo: Koos Groenewold

Choosing the right metabolite matters

Poultry nutrition is complex and requires good understanding. Metabolites matter, but not all are created equal.

To choose the right vitamin D supplementation, understanding the vitamin’s metabolic pathway in the bird and how supplementation can link into this is fundamental. Photo: Shutterstock
To choose the right vitamin D supplementation, understanding the vitamin’s metabolic pathway in the bird and how supplementation can link into this is fundamental. Photo: Shutterstock

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Organic trace minerals improve animal production sustainability

Organic trace elements play an important role in sustainability but also enable better quality products in line with public health regulations.

Feed is the highest cost component in raising poultry, so it is important to ensure that diets are formulated with an optimum cost-to-benefit ratio. Photo: Hans Prinsen
Feed is the highest cost component in raising poultry, so it is important to ensure that diets are formulated with an optimum cost-to-benefit ratio. Photo: Hans Prinsen

A complex battlefield: mycotoxins in the GIT

In this article we delve into the complex processes that take place when mycotoxins enter the gastrointestinal tract. This understanding highlights the cascading effects of mycotoxins on animal health and performance. But what can be done about it?

Most grains are susceptible to mycotoxin contamination, the ultimate consequences of which are diminished nutrient absorption, inflammatory response and pathogenic disorders. Photo: Hans Banus
Most grains are susceptible to mycotoxin contamination, the ultimate consequences of which are diminished nutrient absorption, inflammatory response and pathogenic disorders. Photo: Hans Banus

Pre-slaughter measures have knock-on effect in further processing

Water-spraying and forced ventilation during holding improves meat quality after processing. This article looks into the research.

Meat quality after freezing and thawing improves if birds transported to the slaughterhouse do not endure heat stress. Photo: Hans Prinsen
Meat quality after freezing and thawing improves if birds transported to the slaughterhouse do not endure heat stress. Photo: Hans Prinsen

Column: Data, analytics and evidence-based decisions are key

Mick Keyes, chief technology officer at Poultry Sense, discusses why aligned data throughout the supply chain, which can be readily analysed and interpreted, is going to be key as consumers demand greater visibility from the sector.

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