In ovo feeding; a promising approach?

16-08-2007 | | |
Yegani

It is known that the timing and form of nutrients supplied post-hatch is critical for development of gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It has also been shown that early access to feed enhances growth of the intestinal tract.

It is known that the timing and form of nutrients supplied post-hatch is critical for development of gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It has also been shown that early access to feed enhances growth of the intestinal tract.
It should be reasonable to assume that providing feed to the developing embryo (into amniotic fluid) could be considered as an early access to exogenous nutrients which may enhance GI tract development and affect performance of hatching chicks.
The added nutrients are subsequently exposed to the tissues of GI tract after the embryo naturally consumes the amniotic fluid prior to piping and are then subjected to digestion and absorption by the embryonic intestine.
Studies have demonstrated that the administration of exogenous nutrients into the amnion at 17.5 day of incubation enhanced intestinal development by increasing the size of the villi and the intestinal digestive capacity. This probably leads to higher body weight in in ovo fed chicks.

• How practical do you think this approach is for the poultry industry on a global basis?
• This technology comes at a cost.
• Do you think that better performance of injected day-old chicks can possibly compensate the cost of this technique?
• What are the potential limiting factors which might affect widespread use of this technology?
• Let’s share our opinions/experiences here.




Beheer