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Poultry World edition 4 of 2021 is now online

This edition of Poultry World looks into driving sustainability through transparency, enabled by the creation of the first-ever full supply chain sustainability reporting framework. Then, as the EU pledges to reduce the use of livestock antibiotics, analysis shows that different member states have had drastically different trajectories towards achieving this goal. Also, a study reveals that hens have a strong preference for wooden nests.

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Driving sustainability through transparency

Ryan Bennet, executive director at US Roundtable for Sustainable Poultry & Eggs, comments on the creation of the first-ever full supply chain sustainability reporting framework. The article delves into how to create a common language, common metrics and common indicators throughout the entire value chain in a way that builds trust for all stakeholders.

Bennet: “We came up with a structure which reports back in detail to individuals and guarantees anonymity if shared within the supply chain, unless the links in the chain decide otherwise.” Photo: Moshe Zusman
Bennet: “We came up with a structure which reports back in detail to individuals and guarantees anonymity if shared within the supply chain, unless the links in the chain decide otherwise.” Photo: Moshe Zusman

FreeBirds project advances organic production

Poultry World reports on some of the conclusions highlighted by Valentina Ferrante, senior poultry researcher at the University of Milan, following his study into soil organic matter and nutrient levels in different organic poultry runs – a particularly relevant study given the drive of the European Commission’s Farm to Fork strategy.

The aim of the pan-European FreeBirds project has been to develop successful husbandry practices in organic production to ensure chickens spend more time outdoors. Photo: Peter Roek
The aim of the pan-European FreeBirds project has been to develop successful husbandry practices in organic production to ensure chickens spend more time outdoors. Photo: Peter Roek

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The value of fish silage for broilers

Researchers from the University of Nayarit in Mexico conducted a study to investigate the nutritional value of fish silage in terms of growth performance and meat quality in broilers. The study explores how fish silage can reduce waste and environmental pollution, while providing a good source of essential amino acids and minerals.

Fish waste can be turned into animal feed by grinding, acidifying and then storage. Photo: ANP
Fish waste can be turned into animal feed by grinding, acidifying and then storage. Photo: ANP

Botanical vitamin D tailored for high performance

Vitamin D is an essential micronutrient for livestock, but sufficient levels can be compromised in commercially-raised poultry due to a limited exposure to UV light. Although supplementing through feed can be effective, a targeted approach is required to ensure that vitamin D is metabolised with endogenous enzymes.

Complex and sensitive metabolism means supplying large amounts of vitamin D into feed does not necessarily translate into increased performance. Photo: Marcel Berendsen
Complex and sensitive metabolism means supplying large amounts of vitamin D into feed does not necessarily translate into increased performance. Photo: Marcel Berendsen

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Antibiotic reduction in the EU progressing at different speeds

As the EU pledges to reduce the use of livestock antibiotics, analysis shows that different member states have had drastically different trajectories towards achieving this goal. A closer look at the Netherlands and Spain shows the importance of close cooperation between governments and industries.

IKB Kip is a quality assurance system in the Netherlands developed by and for the broiler sector. Aviagen’s Magnus Swalander received certification for a research facility in 2016 from Hennie de Haan, chair of the Dutch poultry producers’ board. Photo: Kastermans Studio
IKB Kip is a quality assurance system in the Netherlands developed by and for the broiler sector. Aviagen’s Magnus Swalander received certification for a research facility in 2016 from Hennie de Haan, chair of the Dutch poultry producers’ board. Photo: Kastermans Studio

Relying on soybean meal alone can be risky

Researchers in the UK are conducting trials for soybean meal replacements in poultry rations through optimising other protein sources. One new initiative involves recycling industrial carbon dioxide into cost-competitive protein for high value, sustainable animal feed, and another initiative is a bioethanol protein concentrate project.

Professor Emily Burton of Nottingham Trent University noted that we need to reduce the carbon footprint associated with poultry meat. Photo: Nottingham Trent University.
Professor Emily Burton of Nottingham Trent University noted that we need to reduce the carbon footprint associated with poultry meat. Photo: Nottingham Trent University.

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Ensuring water quality in poultry production

Poultry scientist, Brian Fairchild, shares his expertise on water quality and management in poultry production. This article also offers insights into the results from researcher Sharon Mae’s PhD thesis on new tools being used to suppress undesirable bacteria in biofilms.

Water quality receives less attention from poultry producers than nutritional and environmental factors, although both the quantity and quality of water are integral to overall flock health. Photo: Reina de Vries
Water quality receives less attention from poultry producers than nutritional and environmental factors, although both the quantity and quality of water are integral to overall flock health. Photo: Reina de Vries

Flexible poultry processing increases yields

A significant trend adding to the challenges faced by poultry processors, particularly in Western Europe, is the variation in breeds and weights within and between flocks. This article looks at the importance of a flexible solution which offers efficient processing and maximum yields.

Meyn’s new wing cutter automatically adjust to handle grillers weighing up to 4.3kg and is capable of running at line speeds of up to 7,500 birds per hour. Photo: Meyn
Meyn’s new wing cutter automatically adjust to handle grillers weighing up to 4.3kg and is capable of running at line speeds of up to 7,500 birds per hour. Photo: Meyn

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Broiler breeders prefer wooden nests

This article reviews the results from a study focusing on nesting preferences in which hens were given the choice of 4 nest box designs. The research reveals a strong preference for wooden nests and examines how the provision of these nests can contribute to an increased number of eggs laid whilst reducing the number of floor eggs.

At first glance, nest designs may not appear to differ much, but the materials used for nests is an important factor in achieving optimal rearing conditions. Photo: Anne van den Oever
At first glance, nest designs may not appear to differ much, but the materials used for nests is an important factor in achieving optimal rearing conditions. Photo: Anne van den Oever

Beneficial dietary fibre in laying hens

Following an experiment conducted on 72 brown laying hens of various ages, a study finds that it is necessary to provide fermentable dietary fibre as a nutritional basis for gut bacteria and that doing so can positively influence egg production and feed conversion of hens in the laying phase.

A clear connection exists between dietary fibre and a more consistent energy supply, resulting in improved overall health and performance of laying hens. Photo: Herbert Wiggerman
A clear connection exists between dietary fibre and a more consistent energy supply, resulting in improved overall health and performance of laying hens. Photo: Herbert Wiggerman

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Controlling Gumboro consistently

The significance of controlling Gumboro disease, by way of vaccination, is that it maintains the consistency of broiler production, protecting against clinical and sub-clinical infection, thus ensuring the uniformity of the results in the field and at processing.

A thorough Gumboro disease vaccination programme should aim to break the Gumboro cycle and stop the spread of infectious bursal disease. Photo: Stephane Klein
A thorough Gumboro disease vaccination programme should aim to break the Gumboro cycle and stop the spread of infectious bursal disease. Photo: Stephane Klein

Boosting gut integrity with a good source of charcoal

As the use of permitted pharmaceutical solutions to control infections is being increasingly restricted, other more natural strategies are being perused. One such solution is a quality source of charcoal which has shown to effectively support and improve gut integrity.

Pyrogenic carbonaceous materials, otherwise known as charcoal, can bind harmful compounds and boost gut integrity. Photo: Svetlana Kolpakova
Pyrogenic carbonaceous materials, otherwise known as charcoal, can bind harmful compounds and boost gut integrity. Photo: Svetlana Kolpakova

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Insights and alert for the southern hemisphere

Dr David E. Swayne at the USDA offers insight and advise to poultry sectors in the southern hemisphere. He discusses what makes the H5 avian influenza virus different to previous strains, and how outbreaks have affected the poultry industry in Europe and Asia.

Dr David E. Swayne, laboratory director at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory at the US National Poultry Research Center Agricultural Research Service, USDA. Photo: USDA
Dr David E. Swayne, laboratory director at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory at the US National Poultry Research Center Agricultural Research Service, USDA. Photo: USDA

Effects of anti-microbial interventions during the slaughter process

Researchers have conducted a study to better understand how varying pH levels of the chemical peroxy acetic can reduce the risk cross contamination risk of Salmonella, Campylobacter and Escherichia coli during the slaughter process.

The effects were tested on chicken wings that had been artificially inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium, Campylobacter coli and Escherichia coli strains. Photo: Jan Willem Schouten
The effects were tested on chicken wings that had been artificially inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium, Campylobacter coli and Escherichia coli strains. Photo: Jan Willem Schouten

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